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PSLE Timetable Schedule 2014

240114ePrimary School Leaving is a national examination (PSLE) in Singapore administrated by the Ministry of Education (MOE). The PSLE is taken for the 6th years students and moving them to the next level, example Secondary. The exam purpose is to check the proficiency in English Language and other Mother Tongue Language (usually Chinese, Malay, Tamil), and Mathematics and Science. The students who are appearing in exam have time of 2 hours for each subject paper, except language subject.

The time table and schedule has been published on the official website at seab.gov.sg .

PSLE Time Table 2014

The registration for the PSLE exams starts from the March second week each year normally.

  • Registration in 2014 ………………….  14 – 28 March 2014
  • Oral Examination …………………….. 14 & 15 August 2014
  • Listening Comprehensive Exam ….  19 September 2014
  • Written Examination ………………..  25 September – 17 October 2014
  • Marking Exercise …………………….. 14 – 17 October 2014

All the best for all students taking PSLE in 2014!

Also learn how our PSLE A* Achievers Maths Programme has benefited many students in Singapore.

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Can the Singapore Method Help your Children Learn Maths?

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise

1

Singapore teaches maths better than most countries including the UK, according to international rankings for secondary pupils.

The difference starts at an early age.

There are many reasons but one key factor is its step-by-step approach that can be used at home or in the classroom.

Young children are happy playing with blocks or drawing pictures. But they can find number symbols, like 5 + 2 = 7, mystifying.

So the Singapore method begins by allowing children to start learning about maths by playing with real objects, blocks or cut-out pictures.

They build confidence with the basic ideas of adding and taking away. There is then a second stage of drawing pictures representing the objects. And only later do they gradually start to add numbers to their drawings.

Maths without symbols?

5 planesStraight to the symbolic – a leap too far for many children?

In education systems in the UK, pre-school children are often introduced to maths and to number symbols at the same time. For instance through brightly-coloured counting books which show a picture of an apple – or a kite or a butterfly – next to a ‘1’. Two new things next to a ‘2’. Three new things next to a ‘3’. Culminating in a loose group of ten things next to a ’10’.

But number symbols like 5 or 10 as well as symbols like + or – are often difficult for children to understand. And if they are introduced too quickly, there is a risk that young children will struggle and from then on never fully recover their confidence in maths. Failing repeated tests on symbolic sums at school only deepens their anxiety and they soon learn that maths is not for them.

The Singapore method illustrated in more detail below goes more gradually – from handling “concrete” things, to drawing one-to-one “pictorial” iconic representations of them, to eventually understanding and using the mysterious “abstract” symbols with confidence.

1. Lining up objects in a row

Real objects, cut-outs and blocks

Children start by counting familiar things using blocks or cut-out pictures they can physically line up in a row. For instance counting pieces of fruit, their own ages, or people in the room. With one block or cut-out picture for each orange, or year, or person.

They can learn most basic maths concepts with these objects. For instance add objects to the row, or take them away, to understand adding and subtraction. Or split a row in the middle to understand halving.

2. Drawing boxes around pictures

A drawing of 3 oranges in boxes

Then children start to draw pictures on paper of the things they are counting, with a box around each picture. So there’s one box for each thing they are counting. Over time they drop the pictures and just draw the boxes.

3. Labelling the boxes

A drawn box labelled with a 3.

Gradually, once they are confident with drawing boxes to count objects, children start to write the number of boxes as a figure above the drawing.

Eventually they no longer need to draw all the boxes. They just draw one long box or bar and label it with the number. This step away from one-to-one representations to symbols is crucial and it may take a year or more for some children to become confident with it. But the benefits later on are worth it.

The Singapore Model Method

This model of numbers as labelled bars is known as the Singapore model, and it’s a tool children can use to understand almost any concept in maths, including multiplication and division and even algebra.

Professor Lianghuo Fan, former editor-in-chief of Singapore’s maths textbooks, has researched the reasons for Singapore’s success in maths. As he puts it: “People have different views about the reasons for Singapore students’ performance, but one thing that is universally agreed is that the Singapore model method is key.”

You can see examples of different stages of the model in this slideshow:

Algebra bar modelIn a year group there are 50 children. There are 10 fewer girls than boys. How many boys? The model can help visualize the unknown quantity. You can see that x + x – 10 = 50. If you add the 10 you get x + x = 60. So x = 30.
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Motivating Your Child to Do Homework and Study

children-are-made-readers

  • Is your child motivated to do homework and study or do you need to ‘strongly encourage’ your child to do the work?
  • Has homework time become a battleground?

I understand how difficult this can be for you once things get out of hand but DO NOT DESPAIR.  In my last article  Teaching Young Children To Study, I explained the importance of teaching even young children how to study so they can become independent learners at school. A key component of being an independent learner is motivation.

Here is the brief version:

STEP 1: FIND OUT WHAT THE BLOCKAGE IS

For you to be able to help your child overcome homework problems you first need to become a detective like Sherlock Holmes. The important thing to keep in mind is that there is no point forcing your child to do work that he/she is not able to do. All that will happen is that you will both get more emotional and will not be able to think clearly or work with each other effectively. There could be a variety of reasons why your child won’t get on with homework such as:

  • doesn’t understand the work
  • hasn’t or can’t read the instructions properly
  • doesn’t know where to start
  • lacks the basic skills to do the work
  • hasn’t got the materials needed to complete the task

STEP 2: Break the work that needs to be done into a series of SIMPLE STEPS

Thus get your child to DO ONE STEP A TIME.

STEP 3: HAVE PATIENCE

Rome was n0t built in a day. Your goal should be to help your child get a few more skills and a bit more confidence every day. Research shows that the best way to build up good habits is to take small but regular steps. Just do as much in a sitting as you can both manage without getting tense. In the early stages it is often much more effective to do three 10-minute sessions than one 30-minute session.

Remember, if your child is not doing her/his homework effectively at the moment, then small positive changes on a regular basis is far better than no change at all.

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Teaching Young Children To Study

every child can shineWHAT IS STUDY? – Study is the skill of learning something independently of a teacher.

Obviously I did not mean that a 5 year-old should be reading and studying textbooks at night after going to school!

Being an independent learner in Kindergarten means things like being able to FOCUS on what the teacher is saying so the child is be able to COMPREHEND what is being said and to FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS given.

Many children are not capable of concentrating enough to be able to do this effectively when they first arrive at school so they miss a lot of the teaching in class – it just goes straight over their heads. These children are dependent on the teacher instructing and monitoring them individually . . . meanwhile the independent children are getting on with their work and learning things. The independent learners will have been taught good listening and oral comprehension skills by their parents, and just as importantly, they will have been taught the social and emotional skills needed to operate successfully in a room full of people – many of whom will be disruptive of the group as they have not learned good social and emotional skills before coming to school.

By the time your child is 10 years-old, study means a lot more. By then your child will need much more developed written and oral communication skills to be able to make the most of his/her time in class, and be able to do homework with minimal supervision – a child who is not a fluent reader for example will not be able to become a very independent learner. By this age, it is also important that your child has developed the positive Growth Mindset.

On entering Middle School it is important that your child has learned how to take full responsibility for comprehension at all levels. Your child should:

  • KNOW WHAT SHE/HE KNOWS and
  • KNOW WHAT SHE/HE DOES NOT KNOW, know what to do about it, and ACTUALLY DO IT. That might mean independent research or seeking help from an appropriate person.

So you can see, study skills are important right through school. As a caring parent it is important that you monitor your child’s progress very closely, and teach your child good study skills at home – if possible, BEFORE they are needed at school.

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Am I ‘Too Tough’ When I Discipline My Kids?

lable kidsI’ve noticed that the more sternly I speak to my kids — for example, after they’ve run into the street without looking  the more distraught they get. How can I make sure they understand the seriousness of certain situations without making them feel worse?
– Zoe

As the saying goes, “Desperate times call for desperate measures.” When your child’s safety is at risk — whether he’s run into the street, reached for an open flame, or gotten dangerously close to a pool — yelling, screaming, or crying out is a perfectly normal (and necessary!) response. After all, at that moment, you would do anything possible to get your child’s attention and get him out of harm’s way.

After an episode like this, it’s natural for kids to cry — and for you to want to apologize. But the truth is, your kids are likely crying in response to the fear and urgency in your voice, not because you’ve been “too stern.” At times like these, it’s OK to comfort them without apologizing. Give your child a hug and say something like, “I know you’re upset. But what you did was dangerous and I was scared that you were going to get hurt. You must never do that again.” Punishing kids after an event like this is usually not necessary, since they’ve probably learned their lesson.

On the other hand, there are times when being too stern — like yelling regularly for minor offenses — can backfire. Kids can become immune to parents’ overblown reactions and fail to take them seriously. If you feel yourself getting into this habit, take a deep breath before responding to your child’s behavior and ask yourself, “Am I about to overreact?” If so, walk away for a few minutes and come back when you’ve calmed down.

In general, when it comes to disciplining kids, it’s best to speak with a low, firm voice and to keep your focus on the behavior, not the child. It’s also helpful to use natural consequences whenever possible. That means if your child has thrown a toy, ask her to pick it up. If she’s taken something from her sibling, ask her to return it. If she chooses not to comply, an age-appropriate timeout or other consequence should follow, despite tearful pleas. Consistency is the key to effective discipline, and giving in to a child’s tears may inadvertently reinforce negative behavior.

Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD
Date reviewed: July 2010