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Problems with Homework

lead_960From time to time you may have concerns about homework. Meet with teachers early in the school year and ask them to let you know if difficulties arise.

Some problems which may arise are:

  • the homework can regularly be too hard or too easy
  • your child refuses to do assignments despite encouragement
  • your child has problems completing assignments on time
  • you would like your child to do homework missed through illness
  • neither your child nor you understand the homework
  • Read more …

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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Students

effective learners

Habit One: Be Proactive
I am a responsible person.
I take initiative.
I choose my actions, attitudes, and moods.
I do not blame others for my wrong actions. I do the right thing without being asked,
even when no one is looking.
Habit Two: Begin with the End in Mind
I plan ahead and set goals
I do things that have meaning and make a difference.
I am an important part of my classroom and contribute to my school’s mission and vision,
and look for ways to be a good citizen.

Habit Three: Put First Things First
I spend my time on things that are most important.
This means I say no to things I know I should not do.
I set priorities, make a schedule, and follow my plan.
I am disciplined and organized.

Habit Four: Think Win – Win
I balance courage for getting what I want with consideration for what others want.
I make deposits in others’ Emotional Bank Accounts.
When conflicts arise, I look for third alternatives.

Habit Five: Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood
I listen to other people’s ideas and feelings.
I try to see things from their viewpoints.
I listen to others without interrupting.
I am confident in voicing my ideas.
I look people in the eyes when talking.

Habit Six: Synergize
I value other people’s strengths, and learn from them. I get along well with others, even
people who are different than me.
I work well in groups.
I seek out other people’s ideas to solve problems because I know that by teaming with
others we can create better solutions than any one of us alone. I am humble.

Habit Seven: Sharpen the Saw
I take care of my body by eating right, exercising, and getting sleep.
I spend time with my family and friends.
I learn in lots of ways and lots of places, not just at school.
I take time to make meaningful ways to help others.

 

Source: Covey, Stephen R. (2008) The Leader in Me: How Schools and Parents around
the World are Inspiring Greatness, One Child At A Time. Free Press, Detriot MI.

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Parenting Plans – Cultivating Morals & Character in Your Child

PARENTING PLANS…

banner-parenting-issues

… help you to create a vision that guides your decisions and behavior as you raise your child. This is essential to a healthy parent-child relationship. Have you taken the time to think about the values you want to cultivate and the family experiences you want to create? In this article, I’ll ask you to look deep into your heart and think about what it really means to be a parent, what your child needs from you and how you can provide it. I’ll also ask you to consider your own needs, as a parent and as an individual who seeks meaning and purpose in his or her life. By reading this and following my recommendations, you’ll be ready to create your own parenting plan and learn what it really takes to raise a child to maturity and what a delightful journey it is.

First, let’s explore the components of a healthy family

In a healthy family, parenting is a top priority. Discipline is fair, consistent and designed to teach, rather than blame, punish or humiliate. Parents establish firm limits, but allow children freedom of expression within boundaries that are in place not to keep children down, but to keep them safe. Expression of feelings is encouraged. Even negative emotions are okay. The family is a safe haven where the child can relax and be himself.

Parenting plans must respect each person’s individuality

Although each person is a member of this tribe which is your family, individual needs must be encouraged and respected. We’ll also explore what makes up a good parenting plan in this article.

Parents acknowledge that while togetherness is important, everyone has the need for solitude. Time for self-care is also essentially, especially for hard-working parents. Parents need to take time for themselves, so they can fill the cup that gives them the energy to take care of others.

Good parenting plans focus on togetherness and shared experiences, but also allow time for solitude and self-care.

Parents create rituals that make sense within the family and create deep and lasting bonds.

Focus on personal growth

Even as parents are raising their children to become mature adults, they realize that they need to work on their weaknesses and tendencies that are detrimental to a healthy, loving family (such as a tendency to overreact, to lash out when stressed, to drink to relieve tension, to avoid intimacy through workaholism, etc.)

Parenting Plans

Spend quality time with your children each day, but never be fooled into thinking that participating in an occasional fun activity is enough. You must also be there for the daily struggles and problems. This is what I refer to as quantity time.

Do activities together: preparing meals, cleaning the kitchen, riding bikes, walking the dog. Make your drive time to and from school, one-on-one time for sharing feelings, dreams and struggles.

Use what’s happening in the moment to teach self-discipline and cultivate awareness, compassion and a sense of diplomacy.

Create family rituals that have a sense of meaning and foster deep bonds. Don’t just blindly follow traditions. Use them to create your own.

Use the parenting plans on this page as a starting point for your own vision. If you have ideas to contribute, please use the box below. Be part of a caring community of parents around the world who weave their own thread into the tapestry of humanity by consciously raising their children.

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How Parenting Child Development Helps Make You Closer to Your Kids

Parenting is important to you because your children matter more than anyone in the world. As a caring adult, you want to give your kids the best. So you strive to understand child development and child discipline and become a better parent. You work hard for your family and give them more than you had as a child. You read magazines, books, parenting sites to improve yourself. But have you ever asked yourself what you want from this relationship? And have you asked yourself what your children really NEED aside from physical comfort and security?

children

In your heart of hearts, if you imagined the best possible outcome for yourself and your family, what would you foresee?

Would you feel fulfilled if your children grew up to honor, cherish and respect you?

Every parents would.

But how do you create this, especially if you don’t enjoy a healthy relationship with your mom and dad?

And how do you change your parenting style, if you’re flying blind and making it up as you go along?

Where did you learn how to raise kids anyway? Did you go to school and get a masters in child development?

Probably not. (Don’t worry … you don’t need one.)

If you’re like most of us, you learned child discipline from your folks, who learned from theirs.

While there’s nothing wrong with this, especially if you had wise and loving role models, times have changed. Parenting strategies have evolved and our understanding of child development, child behavior and child discipline has led us to become more insightful and humane.

Have your beliefs changed with new findings and understandings or are you still operating from old assumptions?

Are you “parenting in the present” or using child discipline strategies that were passed on to you by your folks and are at least a quarter of a century old?

Much of what you know about raising children you have probably learned unconsciously by watching your mom and dad. For example, while most parents claim they do not buy into their grandparent’s children-should-be-seen-and-not-heard ethic, they have no idea how to communicate with their kids.

If you don’t know how to talk with your children, how can you create a close relationship? 

You can’t. 

But don’t worry. There’s a reason you’ve found this web site.

Within these pages, you will discover compelling insights on child parenting, child development, child behavior, child discipline and more that will help you understand where to start and how to create and maintain a lifetime closeness with your kids that is based on love and mutual respect.

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Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Suhailah Attamimi and that’s a photo of my 9 year old boy and I above. I am the author of this web site and a parenting ebook, How to Rise A Healthy & Positive Child. If the words on this page have touched you, then I can help. I can tell you from experience that there is nothing more fulfilling than creating a close relationship with your kids and raising them to be people of integrity who make good choices on their own.

I walk my talk and share what has worked for me in my relationship with my child. In addition, I have been involve in child education and development for more than 13 years and has a specialized MathsExCEL Center to back me up. I won’t use my knowledge to lecture you, but to gently lead you to insights of your own.

Please accompany me on this journey to learn what your kids really need from you and how to become a parent you can be proud of. Sign up for my periodic newsletter, MathsExCEL (the subscription box appears below), so you’ll know as soon as I post a new article on my site.

Since the newsletters costs nothing, you have nothing to lose and everything to gain. Sign up for MathsExCEL! Newsletters today because your child matters! more than anything in the world.

To subscribe to MathsExCEL!, type in your full name, email address and contact number below. Please note: You must enter your first and last name in the subscription box in order to be added to our list. Your email address will be kept private and confidential.

Subscribe to MathsExCEL!

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Teaching Young Children To Study

every child can shineWHAT IS STUDY? – Study is the skill of learning something independently of a teacher.

Obviously I did not mean that a 5 year-old should be reading and studying textbooks at night after going to school!

Being an independent learner in Kindergarten means things like being able to FOCUS on what the teacher is saying so the child is be able to COMPREHEND what is being said and to FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS given.

Many children are not capable of concentrating enough to be able to do this effectively when they first arrive at school so they miss a lot of the teaching in class – it just goes straight over their heads. These children are dependent on the teacher instructing and monitoring them individually . . . meanwhile the independent children are getting on with their work and learning things. The independent learners will have been taught good listening and oral comprehension skills by their parents, and just as importantly, they will have been taught the social and emotional skills needed to operate successfully in a room full of people – many of whom will be disruptive of the group as they have not learned good social and emotional skills before coming to school.

By the time your child is 10 years-old, study means a lot more. By then your child will need much more developed written and oral communication skills to be able to make the most of his/her time in class, and be able to do homework with minimal supervision – a child who is not a fluent reader for example will not be able to become a very independent learner. By this age, it is also important that your child has developed the positive Growth Mindset.

On entering Middle School it is important that your child has learned how to take full responsibility for comprehension at all levels. Your child should:

  • KNOW WHAT SHE/HE KNOWS and
  • KNOW WHAT SHE/HE DOES NOT KNOW, know what to do about it, and ACTUALLY DO IT. That might mean independent research or seeking help from an appropriate person.

So you can see, study skills are important right through school. As a caring parent it is important that you monitor your child’s progress very closely, and teach your child good study skills at home – if possible, BEFORE they are needed at school.