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6 Test Taking Errors to Avoid

The questionnaire1. Misread Direction Errors

These errors occur when you skip directions or misunderstand directions but answer the question or do the problem anyway.

To avoid this type of error, read all the directions.

2. Careless Errors

Mistakes made which can be caught automatically upon reviewing the test.

To avoid this type of error, watch for simple mistakes carefully as you review the test.

3. Concept Errors

Mistakes made when you do not understand the properties or principles required to work the problem.

To avoid this type of error in the future, you must go back to your textbook or notes and learn why you missed the problems.

4. Application errors

Mistakes that you make when you know this concept but cannot apply it to the problem.

To reduce this type of error, you must, learn to predict the type of application problems that will be on the test.

5. Test Procedure Errors

Mistakes that you make because of the specific way you take tests, such as:

  1. Missing more questions in the 1st-third, 2nd-third or last third of a test. If you find that you miss more questions in a certain part of the test consistently, use your remaining test time to review that part of the test first.
  2. Not completing a problem to its last step.
    To avoid this mistake, review the last step of a test problem first, before doing an in-depth test review.
  3. Changing test answers from the correct ones to incorrect ones.
    If you are a bad answer changer, then write on your test “Don’t change answers.” Only change answers if you can prove to yourself or to the instructor that the changed answer is correct.
  4. Getting stuck on one problem and spending too much time.
    Set a time limit for each problem before moving to the next problem.
  5. Rushing through the easiest part of the test and making careless errors.
    If you do this often, after finishing the test review the easy problems first, then review the harder problems.
  6. Miscopying an answer from your scratch work to the test.
    To avoid this, systematically compare your last problem step on scratch paper with the answer on the test.
  7. Leaving answers blank
    Write down some information or try at least to do the first step.

6. Study Errors

Mistakes that occur when you study the wrong type of material or do not spend enough time studying pertinent material.

To avoid these errors in the future, take some time to track down why the errors occurred so that you can study more effectively the next time.

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8 Ways to Make Your Child’s School Maths Revision Add Up

Numbers-on-a-hopscotch-gr-007

When preparing for a Maths exam, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the amount of work that you need to do, or the amount of content that you need to cover. Moreover, anyone who’s not a natural mathematician will find it difficult to break down and practice particular problems, and will need to spend more time revising core parts of a course. There are a number of approaches, however, that can help you to improve your child’s Maths revision and help them get the most out of their exams.

1. Break Down the Exam

Look at the syllabus and what your child needs to cover in the exam, and check with their tutors or teachers over what sort of time you need to allocate to different parts of the test. Some questions in an exam are only worth one or two marks, so make sure they know how much time they need to work on them – doing practice tests can make it easier.

2. Practice Writing Out Your Calculations

To work through ideas effectively, and to practice for the exam, encourage your teen to write out their calculations and formulas, and draw graphs and equations.

3. Identify Key Areas

When looking at the syllabus, try to identify areas that they are particularly unsure about, and make sure that they spend more time on them than going over anything they’re already familiar with. You may want to speak to their tutor about extra resources if they’re struggling with a particular area.

4. Practice with Friends and Family

This is a particularly useful approach if there’s a mental Maths part of a test – asking them questions, or even just getting them to recite formulae, can help your child to be more confident for an upcoming exam.

5. Update Your Child’s Equipment

While they should already have all the equipment they need from their lessons, it’s worth double checking that they have, and are comfortable with using their calculator, and any extra tools they might need on the day of the exam.

6. Use Revision Cards

Cue cards and notes can be particularly useful for remembering key points, and can be stuck up around their room to remind them. Diagrams and equations can also be added and stuck to noticeboards to go over.

7. Use Maths Revision Apps

There are many different apps available for  Maths revision, depending on what level they’re studying. Collins offer revision apps to go with their textbooks, while the BBC’s GCSE Bitesize series has its own series of apps. Maths Card and other apps are also useful for producing virtual post it notes, and for taking practice tests.

8. Vary Their Revision

Perhaps the most important thing to focus on when doing Maths revision is to vary it to make sure they’re not overloading themselves in key areas. Don’t let them focus on one area all the time, and try not to allow them to get stuck on parts of an exam that they find too difficult – similarly, a long period of gradual revision is always better than rushing to get everything completed on time a few weeks before an exam is set to be held.