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Helping Your Student Get the Most Out of Homework

Hints_and_TipsMany students try to avoid it, but teaching and learning research indicates that children who spend more time on regularly assigned, meaningful homework, on average, do better in school.

This article answers questions many people have about homework. It gives specific advice for helping your children. Here are some quick hints to help your child get the most out of homework.

Homework Hints

  • Assume that your children will have studying to do every night.
  • Ask your children if they understand their homework. If they do not, work a few examples together.
  • Ask your children to show you their homework after the teacher returns it, to learn where they’re having
    trouble and where they’re doing well. See if your children did the work correctly.
  • Stay in touch with your children’s teachers. Ask about their classes and what they are studying. Ask
    their teachers how you can support what they are studying (flash cards, spelling, etc.).
  • Remember, you and their teachers want the same thing—to help your children learn.
  • Don’t be afraid to get in touch with the teacher if you and your child don’t understand an assignment
    or if your child is having a great deal of trouble. Almost all parents run into these problems, and
    teachers are glad to help.
  • Don’t do your children’s work for them. Help them learn how to do it themselves.
  • Show your children that you think homework is important. If you are at work during homework time,
    ask to see their work when you get home.
  • Praise your children for doing well. Make praise a habit.
  • Maintain a portfolio of “best pieces.”
  • Ask your school about tips or guides for helping your children develop good study habits.
  • Help older students organize their assignments by recording them on calendars or planners, along
    with due dates, dates turned in, etc.
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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Students

effective learners

Habit One: Be Proactive
I am a responsible person.
I take initiative.
I choose my actions, attitudes, and moods.
I do not blame others for my wrong actions. I do the right thing without being asked,
even when no one is looking.
Habit Two: Begin with the End in Mind
I plan ahead and set goals
I do things that have meaning and make a difference.
I am an important part of my classroom and contribute to my school’s mission and vision,
and look for ways to be a good citizen.

Habit Three: Put First Things First
I spend my time on things that are most important.
This means I say no to things I know I should not do.
I set priorities, make a schedule, and follow my plan.
I am disciplined and organized.

Habit Four: Think Win – Win
I balance courage for getting what I want with consideration for what others want.
I make deposits in others’ Emotional Bank Accounts.
When conflicts arise, I look for third alternatives.

Habit Five: Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood
I listen to other people’s ideas and feelings.
I try to see things from their viewpoints.
I listen to others without interrupting.
I am confident in voicing my ideas.
I look people in the eyes when talking.

Habit Six: Synergize
I value other people’s strengths, and learn from them. I get along well with others, even
people who are different than me.
I work well in groups.
I seek out other people’s ideas to solve problems because I know that by teaming with
others we can create better solutions than any one of us alone. I am humble.

Habit Seven: Sharpen the Saw
I take care of my body by eating right, exercising, and getting sleep.
I spend time with my family and friends.
I learn in lots of ways and lots of places, not just at school.
I take time to make meaningful ways to help others.

 

Source: Covey, Stephen R. (2008) The Leader in Me: How Schools and Parents around
the World are Inspiring Greatness, One Child At A Time. Free Press, Detriot MI.

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Read Aloud Tips

 Find a time to read when you can both relax and enjoy it – try bedtime, nap time, snack time, after dinner.

 Get comfortable. Find a cozy spot to read and make sure the TV and other distractions are off.

 Read the book or story yourself before you read it to your child.

 If your child doesn’t like a book, switch to another. If he or she isn’t in the mood, stop reading and try again later.

 Go to the library with your children regularly. Ask the librarian to recommend books and book lists. Get your children their own library cards.

 Build a home collection of books. Shop at garage and book sales. Trade books with friends

 Encourage your children to look at books on their own. Let them take books to bed and read themselves to sleep,but don’t ask questions.

 You don’t have to be a great reader, just read from the heart.

 Make it fun. It’s not a lesson.

 Talk about the stories with your child, but don’t ask questions.

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Learn how you can develop the same love for Maths for your Child at MathsExCEL

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